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Location: Vero Beach, Florida, United States

My name is Pat and I live in Florida. My skin will never be smooth again and my hair will never see color. I enjoy collecting autographs and playing in Paint Shop Pro.,along with reading and writing. Sometimes, I enjoy myself by doing volunteer "work" helping celebrities at autograph shows. I love animals and at one time I did volunteer work for Tippi Hedren's Shambala Preserve.

Monday, March 06, 2017

Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run

Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run: A Call to Those Who Would Save the Earth  by David Brower (1995).

(Book 10 for 2017)

Paperback: 208 pages
Publisher: New Society Publishers; 2nd edition (April 1, 2000)
ISBN-10: 0865714118






Amazon:

This is the testament of one of the few authentic sages of our time. Brower's voice is passionate, perfectly cadenced, humorous, and very wise. And original: while most writers point to where we are, this one draws the map.?Edward O. Wilson, author, The Diversity of Life and Naturalist

Credited with galvanizing an entire generation of environmentalists in the 60's, David Brower, the highly respected "archdruid" of the modern environmental movement, recalls with wit and wisdom his 50 years of controversial activism and offers an inspired strategy for the next generation of "those who would save the Earth."

In this intelligent and engaging chronicle of his years as an agitator for the planet, Brower points out the irony that since the first Earth Day 25 years ago, we've lost one-seventh of the world's productive land to pollution, clear cutting, and pavement-and our population has doubled! From the politics of preserving the environment and how to use New York-style PR to save tigers and dolphins, to reengineering cities, the future of hypercars, and his vision for the Earth Corps, Brower takes us on a sweeping journey of what has been and what could be if we apply CPR (Conservation, Preservation, Restoration) to our wounded world. Printed on entirely tree-free kenaf paper, Let the Mountains Talk, Let the Rivers Run follows its own prescription for saving the world's forests.

This book is about saving our environment.  Animals, Land, Air, and Water... if you have no interest in the Earth we live on then a book such as this will never go on your TBR list.

I found parts I want to share.. just in case it matters..



(pg. 16)  What happened? Sometimes we have been greedy and unthinking, but at other times the road to environmental disaster  has been paved with good intentions.  Too often in what we do, we fail to consider the two most important things: the cost to the future, and the cost to the Earth. We can be very clever, we humans, but sometimes not so smart.

(pg. 24)

Consider what my friend Justice William O. Douglas once told President Franklin D. Roosevelt: Andy government bureau more than ten years old should be abolished, because after that it becomes more concerned with its image than with its mission.

(pg 59)

What we need in these perilous times is  consummate negotiator between the Earth and its human predators.

(pg 94)

You don't know how to fix the holes in our ozone layer.

You don't know how to bring salmon back up a dead stream.

You don't know how to bring back and animal now extinct.

And you can't bring back the forests that once grew where there is now desert.

If you don't know how to fix it, Please stop breaking it!

(pg 126)

We need to tire of trashing wildness.  It's not making us happy.  It's not making us healthy.  It is making us miserable and despairing.  Killing trees, habitat, and animals and separating ourselves from nature is making us all a bit crazy.  We nee to save the wild in order to save ourselves.

(pg 131)

In wilderness is the preservation of the world.

(pg133)

Nevertheless, I concluded that our own major wilderness areas in North America are wilder than anything in the Galapagos, although our wildlife will never be as untroubled by people.  Our wilderness will remain wilder so long as we stop chopping away at it. That said, let's remember that only about 4 percent of the United States is designated wilderness, and half of this is in Alaska. Loopholes abound in the legal language protecting these  remnants, and each generation must review the gems left it by the generation before, and be ready to guard the house against burglars.  The well-traveled Sierra and the lonely Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana, according to an army study for World War II, are the only two places in the Lower Forty-eight where you can get more than ten miles away from a road.

(pg 178)

In the not so distant past, I saw Murray's remark on commitment serve almost as religion for the people, including me, who helped keep dams our of Dinosaur National Monument, the Yukon, and the Grand Canyon, who helped keep loggers with itchy axes out of Olympic National Park, who helped ban DDT, who helped establish the National Wilderness Preservation System and additions  to the National Park System in the North Cascades, Kings Canyon, the Redwoods, Great Basin , at Point Reyes, and the Golden Gate, Cape Cod, Fire Island.

   We helped do all this with a Sierra Club membership less than one-tenth of its present size.  Even our success in gaining passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 was accomplished with a far smaller club than now exists.

  There are now millions of dues-paying environmentalists in the United States alone.  Some count the number at 10 million.  There are more; they just haven't signed up yet.  But whatever the number, they don't seem to have near the power they should.



This is the type of book that is totally up to the person who realizes they have an interest in the destruction of our World, and into Americas portion of it all.

Thursday, March 02, 2017

The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches

The Dead in Their Vaulted Arches by Alan Bradley.
Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: Bantam (December 30, 2014)
ISBN-10: 0385344066

(Book 9 for 2017)


On a spring morning in 1951, eleven-year-old chemist and aspiring detective Flavia de Luce gathers with her family at the railway station, awaiting the return of her long-lost mother, Harriet. Yet upon the train’s arrival in the English village of Bishop’s Lacey, Flavia is approached by a tall stranger who whispers a cryptic message into her ear. Moments later, he is dead, mysteriously pushed under the train by someone in the crowd. Who was this man, what did his words mean, and why were they intended for Flavia? Back home at Buckshaw, the de Luces’ crumbling estate, Flavia puts her sleuthing skills to the test. Following a trail of clues sparked by the discovery of a reel of film stashed away in the attic, she unravels the deepest secrets of the de Luce clan, involving none other than Winston Churchill himself. Surrounded by family, friends, and a famous pathologist from the Home Office—and making spectacular use of Harriet’s beloved Gipsy Moth plane, Blithe Spirit—Flavia will do anything, even take to the skies, to land a killer.
Wow! I forgot how much I enjoyed Flavia  and her chemistry and her very special family!   This is book 6 in the series and all of them have been totally enjoyable!
This book had a bit of sadness to it and yet it didn't slow down.  Quite a few family secrets and surprises in this one!
If you've read any of them I suggest you keep reading.  And, if you haven't read any of this series I think you would enjoy them.. It all begins with Sweetness At the Bottom of the Pie...
I still love t hat Favia named her bicycle! (I named mine too! Mine was Nellie Belle )
There are two more yet to read but one has so many choices that I now can no longer make up my mind! lol

Sunday, February 26, 2017

When Falcons Fall

When Falcons Fall by C.S. Harris.
Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: Berkley;(March 7, 2017)
ISBN-10: 0451471172

(Book 8 for 2017)


Ayleswick-on-Teme, 1813. Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, and his wife, Hero, have come to this deceptively peaceful Shropshire village to honor a slain friend. But when the body of a young widow is found on the banks of the river Teme, the village’s inexperienced new magistrate turns to Sebastian for help. Sebastian soon realizes that Emma Chance was hiding her true identity, and she was not the first beautiful young woman in the village to be murdered. Also troubling are the machinations of Lucien Bonaparte, the estranged brother of the megalomaniac French Emperor Napoléon. Held captive under the British government’s watchful eye, Bonaparte is restless, ambitious, and treacherous.
Home to the eerie ruins of an ancient monastery, Ayleswick reveals itself to be a dark and dangerous place with a violent past that may be connected to Sebastian’s own unsettling origins. And as he faces his most diabolical opponent ever, he is forced to consider what malevolence he’s willing to embrace in order to destroy a killer
.


Wow, hard to believe I've read this whole series of books... 11 of them! Number 12 comes out in April.

I find the main characters very likeable and "their" story has progress along with the murder mysteries that they have worked on.  That's not really saying you have to begin at book one, but I did.  So spread them out and I've read them over a few years. I also have to mention that it's one of the few women authors that I read regularly. Not the ONLY one but there are only a few that seem to write murder mysteries.  

So.. it's a very readable series.  Short chapters.  Good characters.  And just plain enjoyable.


Books read so far this year:
1:The Book of Speculation...............Erika Swyler..........(384 pgs)
2:Lost and Gone Forever.................Alex Grecian..........(384 pgs)
3:The Forgotten Room....................Karen White...........(384 pgs)
4:Ruler of the Night ...................David Morell..........(352 pgs)

5:Lost Among the Living.................Simone St. James.......(352 pgs)
6:Guilty Thing..........................Frances Wilson.........(397 pgs)
7:The Inheritance.......................Charles Finch..........(294 pgs)
8:When Falcons Fall.....................C.S. Harris............(355 pgs)

Saturday, February 18, 2017

The Inheritance

The Inheritance by Charles Finch.
Hardcover: 304 pages
Publisher: Minotaur Books (November 1, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1250070422


Charles Lenox has received a cryptic plea for help from an old Harrow schoolmate, Gerald Leigh, but when he looks into the matter he finds that his friend has suddenly disappeared. As boys they had shared a secret: a bequest from a mysterious benefactor had smoothed Leigh’s way into the world after the death of his father. Lenox, already with a passionate interest in detective work, made discovering the benefactor's identity his first case – but was never able to solve it.
Now, years later, Leigh has been the recipient of a second, even more generous bequest. Is it from the same anonymous sponsor? Or is the money poisoned by ulterior motives? Leigh’s disappearance suggests the latter, and as Lenox tries, desperately, to save his friend’s life, he’s forced into confrontations with both the most dangerous of east end gangs and the far more genteel denizens of the illustrious Royal Society. When someone close to the bequest dies, Lenox must finally delve deep into the past to uncover at last the identity of the person who is either his friend’s savior – or his lethal enemy.

This was an enjoyable read. Obviously a much faster read than my last book.

Charles Finch has written a number of books using the same main character of Charles Lenox, but this was my first read of his detective.  There were some really good twists and turns and as much as the case seems solved with still chapters to read.. it comes up with enough to be sure they cover every little thing along the way.
Gerald Leigh, the school mate he is helping stays in the background yet when he pops up he is most memorable.

A good quick read  and easy enough to follow that you never forget where you are in the case.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey

Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De  Quincey by Frances Wilson.

Book 6 for 2017

Hardcover: 416 pages
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (October 4, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0374167303




 

Publishers Weekly Ten Best Nonfiction Books of 2016

Thomas De Quincey was an obsessive. He was obsessed with Wordsworth and Coleridge, whose Lyrical Balladsprovided the script to his life, and by the idea of sudden death. Running away from school to pursue the two poets, De Quincey insinuated himself into their world. Basing his sensibility on Wordsworth’s and his character on Coleridge’s, he forged a triangle of unusual psychological complexity.

Aged twenty-four, De Quincey replaced Wordsworth as the tenant of Dove Cottage, the poet’s former residence in Grasmere. In this idyllic spot he followed the reports of the notorious Ratcliffe Highway murders of 1811, when two families, including a baby, were butchered in their own homes. In his opium-soaked imagination the murderer became a poet while the poet became a murderer. Embedded in On Murder as One of the Fine Arts, De Quincey’s brilliant series of essays, Frances Wilson finds the startling story of his relationships with Wordsworth and Coleridge.

Opium was the making of De Quincey, allowing him to dissolve self-conflict, eliminate self-recrimination, and divest himself of guilt. Opium also allowed him to write, and under the pseudonym “The Opium-Eater” De Quincey emerged as the strangest and most original journalist of his age. His influence has been considerable. Poe became his double; Dostoevsky went into exile with Confessions of an English Opium-Eater in his pocket; and Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, George Orwell, Alfred Hitchcock, and Vladimir Nabokov were all De Quincey devotees.

There have been other biographies of Thomas De Quincey, but Guilty Thing is the first to be animated by the spirit of De Quincey himself. Following the growth of his obsessions from seed to full flowering and tracing the ways they intertwined, Frances Wilson finds the master key to De Quincey’s vast Piranesian mind. Unraveling a tale of hero worship and revenge, Guilty Thing brings the last of the Romantics roaring back to life and firmly establishes Wilson as one of our foremost contemporary biographers.

 

So...

After reading David Morrell's trilogy, which included a character named Thomas De Quincey. And after my girlfriend in England, Cath, told me he was a real person, I wanted to know about him.    Several months ago I downloaded his Autobiography of Confessions of an Opium Eater, but when I read it, it was only 48 pages, so I thought it wasn't the whole book. I have since found out the "book version" isn't very long either.  I therefore put it on the back burner, so to speak, and forgot about it until recently when I read the third book of Morrell's trilogy, Ruler of the Night.  My interest got sparked again.  So I sent for this book, Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey.

I did find out what parts I read of him in Morrell's novels were true and what was not.

I found out De Quincey added the "De" to his name, it was only Quincey.

He was but 4 foot 11 inches tall.  He had 7 siblings, he loved poetry and taught him self how to speak and write fluent Greek.

De Quincey, was known as the Opium Eater, because he chose to present himself as he really was.  He began on Laudanum drops for a headache and it escalated  and by 1813 he was taking 8,000 drops a day.

His other addictions included books and indebtedness.  Living much of his time on the streets. 

Eventually, he married his servant and had 8 children . 

The book was not easy for me to read.  I am not literate in many long words and the author chose to write in the manor or the literate people such as De Quincey to write the book.  I did persist and did read the entire book, and it was interesting.  It also spoke of the era in which he lived and other authors known in literature of that time.

Not a book for everyone, but surely a book for someone who wanted to know about Thomas De Quincey: the Opium Eater. 

Friday, February 03, 2017

Lost Among the Living

Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James.
(Book 5)
Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: NAL; 1st edition (April 5, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0451476190


Amazon Review:
England, 1921. Three years after her husband, Alex, disappeared, shot down over Germany, Jo Manders still mourns his loss. Working as a paid companion to Alex's wealthy, condescending aunt, Dottie Forsyth, Jo travels to the family’s estate in the Sussex countryside. But there is much she never knew about her husband’s origins…and the revelation of a mysterious death in the Forsyths’ past is just the beginning…
All is not well at Wych Elm House. Dottie's husband is distant, and her son was grievously injured in the war. Footsteps follow Jo down empty halls, and items in her bedroom are eerily rearranged. The locals say the family is cursed, and that a ghost in the woods has never rested. And when Jo discovers her husband’s darkest secrets, she wonders if she ever really knew him.  Isolated in a place of deception and grief, she must find the truth or lose herself forever.
And then a familiar stranger arrives at Wych Elm House…

I enjoyed this book.  It's a book with family history and secrets.. so, what's not to like? It was fast reading and interesting.  And yes... part of the secrets was a "possible" murder!
It had ghosts... but not overly  used.
It takes place in a old large home with (or without) servants, and it took some unexpected twists and turns.  It also held true to the England of 1921. 
This was a nice break from having detectives solve something. 
I've read one other book by Simone St. James called The Haunting of Maddy Clare, which I enjoyed also.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Ruler of the Night

Ruler of the Night by David Morrell.

Hardcover: 352 pages
Publisher: Mulholland Books (November 15, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0316307904






The notorious Opium-Eater returns in the sensational climax to David Morrell's acclaimed Victorian mystery trilogy.
1855. The railway has irrevocably altered English society, effectively changing geography and fueling the industrial revolution by shortening distances between cities: a whole day's journey can now be covered in a matter of hours. People marvel at their new freedom.
But train travel brings new dangers as well, with England's first death by train recorded on the very first day of railway operations in 1830. Twenty-five years later, England's first train murder occurs, paralyzing London with the unthinkable when a gentleman is stabbed to death in a safely locked first-class passenger compartment.
In the next compartment, the brilliant opium-eater Thomas De Quincey and his quick-witted daughter, Emily, discover the homicide in a most gruesome manner. Key witnesses and also resourceful sleuths, they join forces with their allies in Scotland Yard, Detective Ryan and his partner-in-training, Becker, to pursue the killer back into the fogbound streets of London, where other baffling murders occur. Ultimately, De Quincey must confront two ruthless adversaries: this terrifying enemy, and his own opium addiction which endangers his life and his tormented soul.


And so ends a really good trilogy. (sigh) 

When I read the first book, and after I told my friend Catherine Russell that I loved the character of Thomas De Quincey, that was in the book, she let me know that Thomas De Quincey was a real person!  He was Thomas De Quincey the Opium Eater. (which is how he is portrayed in the books).  Well, some time ago I got a free download of De Quincey's Confessions of an Opium Eater, but found it was only 48 pages long.  Now, having read all three books I found another book about his life and ordered it. (Guilty Thing: A Life of Thomas De Quincey by Frances   Wilson.)

 



All three books were captivating. 

Murder as a Fine Art

Inspector of the Dead

Ruler of the Night

 



Morrell's words put you in England at the time Scotland Yard needed De Quincey's help.  All of them are so well written, I hate knowing the same characters won't be used again.

If you like "vintage" England for a crime series you should try the books of David Morrell.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

The Forgotten Room

The Forgotten Room by Karen White, Beatriz Williams & Lauren Willig.

Hardcover: 384 pages
Publisher: NAL (January 19, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0451474627




Amazon Review

1945: When the critically wounded Captain Cooper Ravenal is brought to a private hospital on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, young Dr. Kate Schuyler is drawn into a complex mystery that connects three generations of women in her family to a single extraordinary room in a Gilded Age mansion.
Who is the woman in Captain Ravenel's portrait miniature who looks so much like Kate?  And why is she wearing the ruby pendant handed down to Kate by her mother?  In their pursuit of answers, they find themselves drawn into the turbulent stories of Gilded Age Olive Van Alen, driven from riches to rags, who hired out as a servant in the very house her father designed, and Jazz Age Lucy Young, who came from Brooklyn to Manhattan in pursuit of the father she had never known.  But are Kate and Cooper ready for the secrets that will be revealed in the Forgotten Room? 
The Forgotten Room, set in alternating time periods, is a sumptuous feast of a novel brought to vivid life by three brilliant storytellers.


Wow.. this makes 10 books I've read by Karen White over the years!  If you wonder why that surprises me, it's because most of them involve a love story and I am not big into love stories.  It seems however she writes a compelling story around the love story to make them interesting enough for me to enjoy.   In this one there were three generations of mystery to solve along with the love story.  ...and I do like family secrets or discovering information on families.  So this one filled the bill nicely.

I think Karen White books are a good gap filler for me to break away from crime now and then.  So, it that's you.. you may well enjoy this book.  Or.. one of her many other books!

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Lost and Gone Forever

Lost and Gone Forever: by Alex Grecian.

Hardcover: 384 pages
Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons(May 17, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0399176101


 



an Amazon review..

All of my favorite characters are back so immediately upon starting this book I felt as though I was right back with the London Murder Squad...except that nothing was the same. So...in order to truly get into this book you really have to have read all of the others that came before it. There really isn't any other way to truly understand what these characters have gone through and how much they have endured. So...briefly...Walter Day has been held captive by Jack ( the Ripper ) for a year. Hammersmith...a former police associate of Day's...has a private investigator's practice specifically set up by Claire Day...Walter's wife...to find Day. Jack is clever and cruel and sadistic is still killing people. There are other people...specifically hired to kill Jack...they are hired by a powerful secret society...not the police. These books take place in Victorian London so everything is kind of squalid, smelly and vermin filled...plus there are lots of orphans. In those days a penny bought a lot! Jack has messed with Walter Day's head so much that he really doesn't even know who he is any more.

Alex Grecian has now written 5 books of Scotland Yard's Murder Squad.  .. and I have read them all!  He built some really good characters and one gets invested enough to want to keep reading more !

In order the books are:  The Yard,  The Black Country,  The Devil's Workshop, The Harvest Man and Lost and Gone Forever.  In order to really know the characters one should start at the beginning.  Even though they are all new cases, what happens to the main characters changes with each book.  I certainly hope this isn't the last of the Scotland Yard's Murder Squad!

Wednesday, January 04, 2017

The Book of Speculation

The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler.

Paperback: 384 pages
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin(May 31, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1250055636




An Amazon Best Book Water shrouds the fascinating, often doomed characters of The Book of Speculation. Featuring mermaids, swarms of horseshoe crabs, deadly floods, and the silent secrets of an ancient tarot deck, The Book of Speculation is split like a savory peach between the odd ventures of a traveling carnival in the late 1700s and the modern-day discovery by librarian Simon Watson of an old, handwritten volume containing his grandmother’s name. The water-damaged book may reveal the root of certain mysteries in his family, such as why the women can hold their breath far, far longer than normal, and the inexplicable reason they have all drowned while young women on the exact same date—a date that is only a few days away as the book begins. When Simon’s sister, Enola, unexpectedly returns home, vibrating with an angry sadness Simon has never seen before, Simon dives deeper into the book and the dark waters of their family history, hoping to change what he fears is her destiny. Erika Swyler has written an engrossing literary tale-spinner with an assurance rarely mastered in debut novels, allowing a well-placed detail or a lyrical phrase to paint a character or sketch even as she builds tension like a pro. As Simon grows obsessed with unraveling the secrets in his book, so will you become bewitched by The Book of Speculation.

I picked this book up at a thrift store. The cover read like it was more of a family mystery then anything else.  And it was!  It was a nice break from detective books.  It read a lot like digging up ancestry, but in this case it wasn't just an interest... it turned into fear for life.

I read it pretty quickly so that means it held my interest, and it did have some surprises along the way.

I was never much into "side shows" or Tarot cards, but in this case it worked well.  By the end of the book I was wondering how people put so much belief in Tarot cards..  and made me curious at the same time .  Has anyone ever had the fortune told?

 

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Coffin Road

Coffin Road by Peter May.

Hardcover: 400 pages
Publisher: Quercus (October 4, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1681443899


 

Amazon Review

In his latest mystery set in Scotland and the Outer Hebrides, award-winning author Peter May spins a tale about three disparate cases that may or may not be linked...
On the remote Isle of Harris in Scotland's Outer Hebrides, a man washes up on a deserted beach, hypothermic and completely disoriented. He has no idea who he is or how he got there. The only clue to his condition is a map of the island showing a desolate, ancient path called the Coffin Road. With a sense of dread and no clear idea what lies at the other end, he knows he must follow the trail if he has any hope of discovering his identity.
Meanwhile, homicide detective George Gunn makes the rough ocean crossing to a remote, sea-battered lighthouse on a rock in the northern Atlantic, twenty miles west of the Outer Hebrides, to investigate a brutal murder. Despite its isolation, the tiny island has seen its share of tragedy: more than a century earlier, three lighthouse keepers disappeared, never to be seen or heard from again. And now there is a new tragedy, and Gunn must figure out what happened.
At the same time, a teenage girl lies in her Edinburgh bedroom, desperate to discover the truth about her father's death. Two years after the discovery of the pioneering scientist's suicide note, Karen Fleming still cannot accept that her father would willingly abandon her. And the more she discovers about the nature of his research, the more she suspects that suicide had nothing to do with it.


I am not sure if it's Peter May's writing that I like so much..or.. where he puts me for his story.  I can't say that I like this book "better" then "The Lewis Trilogy" but I know I had no problem in wanting to "read more" each day.

This is a hard review for me.  When my son passed away I was reading a different book. One in which I really thought I could get into.  However, after reading 200 of the 400 pages I could not get into it. I felt as if I was reading the same things over and over.  I don't know if it was the book, or my not being able to put my mind into the book.  And so, this book.. helped somewhat. I knew what was going on and felt that I was able to want to know the outcome.

This is a good stand alone book, but if I had my druthers I would recommend The Lewis Trilogy to anyone who thinks they want to be in a place they never thought they would be.

And so.. I end 2016 having read only 43 books. I thought I would hit 50 but life got in the way.  Maybe 2017 will give me more interesting books to read.  Here is the list of what I read this year.:



1..The Murder Man......................Tony Parsons..........(384 pgs)
2..Strings of Murder.....................Oscar De Muriel.......(406 pgs)
3..The Haunting of Maddy Clare......Simone St. James......(329 pgs)
4..The Vanishing........................Wendy Webb............(304 pgs)
5..Jack Kennedy Elusive Hero........Chris Matthews........(496 pgs)
6..These Few Precious Days..........Christopher Andersen..(336 pgs)


7..Inspector of the Dead..............David Morrell........(352 pgs)
9..Jackie After Jack...................Christopher Andersen.(427 pgs)
10.Empty Mansions....................Bill Dedman..........(456 pgs)
11.Cover of Snow......................Jenny Milchman.......(326 pgs)
12.Things Half in Shadow.............Alan Fin.............(448 pgs)


13.The Lake House.....................Kate Morton.........(512 pgs)
14.Wild Fell.............................Michael Rowe........(180 pgs)
15.Wit and Wisdom of Downton Abbey....Jessica Fellows.....(127 pgs)
16.Uprooted............................Naomi Novik.........(456 pgs)
17.Anatomy of Evil....................Will Thomas.........(336 pgs)
18.House on an Irish Hillside.........Felicity McCoy......(320 pgs)
19.The Silent Sister...................Diane Chamberlain...(368 pgs)


20.Pretty Girls.........................Karin Slaughter.....(416 pgs)

21.The Black Box.......................Michael Connelly....(480 pgs)
22.Cracks in the Sidewalk..............Bette L. Crosby.....(332 pgs)
23.A Memory of Violets.................Hazel Gaynor........(432 pgs)
24.The Midnight Rose...................Lucinda Riley.......(496 pgs)
25.The Likeness........................Tana French.........(466 pgs)


26.Faithful Place.......................Tana French........(400 pgs)
27.Since She Went Away..................David Bell.........(412 pgs)


28.Broken Harbor........................Tana French........(450 pgs)
29.The Burning Room.....................Michael Connelly...(576 pgs)
30.The Buried Giant.....................Kazuo Ishiguro.....(336 pgs)


31.Black Rabbit Hall.....................Eve Chase..........(384 pgs)
32.The Silent Girls......................Eric Rickstad......(416 pgs)
33.The Woman who Walked into the Sea.....Mark D Home....(352 pgs)
34.The Life we Bury......................Allen Eskens.......(303 pgs)
35.Every Dead Thing......................John Connolly......(512 pgs)


36.Carved in Bone........................Jefferson Bass.....(352 pgs)
37.Who Buries the Dead...................C.S. Harris........(352 pgs)
38.The Thirteenth Tale...................Diane Setterfield..(406 pgs)
39.Abomination...........................Colleen Coble......(336 pgs)
40.The Hidden Child......................Camilla Lackberg...(526 pgs)


41.The Uninvited.........................Cat Winters........(343 pgs)
42.The Sound of Glass....................Karen White........(448 pgs)


43.Coffin Road...........................Peter May..........(392 pgs)

So many books...  so little time.

Wednesday, November 09, 2016

The Sound of Glass

The Sound of Glass by Karen White.

Paperback: 448 pages
Publisher: NAL;(April 5, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0451470907






Two years after the death of her husband, Merritt Heyward receives unexpected news—Cal’s family home in Beaufort, South Carolina, bequeathed by his reclusive grandmother, now belongs to Merritt.
In Beaufort, the secrets of Cal’s unspoken-of past reside among the pluff mud and jasmine of the ancestral Heyward home on the Bluff. This unknown legacy, now Merritt’s, will change and define her as she navigates her new life—a life complicated by the arrival of her too young stepmother and ten-year-old  half brother.
Soon, in this house of strangers, Merritt is forced into unraveling the Heyward family past as she faces her own fears and finds the healing she needs in the salt air of the Low country.


I have read several books by Karen White and enjoyed them all.  She has written many more but at times when I read reviews they just aren't for me, but, the ones I have chosen have been very good and I even have one on my wish list yet!

This is a very touching story of a woman beginning her life over again after the death of her husband.  She inherits her mother-in-laws old home in South Carolina and decides to start life again there, and moves from Maine to South Carolina.

Many interesting life stores rolled into one in this book, along with a love story.  There is more then one kind of love and there are more then one type in this book.  Typically I am not a love story reader but some have the knack to pull me in and this is one of them.

I enjoyed the book and hope one day to get another book of hers to read. 

Thursday, November 03, 2016

The Uninvited

The Uninvited by Cat Winters.

Paperback: 368 pages
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (August 11, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0062347330


 



 

Amazon Review:

Twenty-five year old Ivy Rowan rises from her bed after being struck by the flu, only to discover the world has been torn apart in just a few short days.

But Ivy’s life-long gift—or curse—remains.  For she sees the uninvited ones—ghosts of loved ones who appear to her, unasked, unwelcomed, for they always herald impending death. On that October evening in 1918 she sees the spirit of her grandmother, rocking in her mother’s chair. An hour later, she learns her younger brother and father have killed a young German out of retaliation for the death of Ivy’s older brother Billy in the Great War.

Horrified, she leaves home, to discover the flu has caused utter panic and the rules governing society have broken down. Ivy is drawn into this new world of jazz, passion, and freedom, where people live for the day, because they could be stricken by nightfall. But as her ‘uninvited guests’ begin to appear to her more often, she knows her life will be torn apart once more, but Ivy has no inkling of the other-worldly revelations about to unfold.

The Uninvited is an atmospheric, haunting, and utterly compelling novel.



Ok, so.... this had a very unexpected ending!  This is a good thing ! I am not the brightest bulb in the pack but I truly didn't pick up on any hints that the ending would be as it was!

Once again a book I read is set in wartime. Even "American Germans" are shunned against.  There is so much hatred around, it was not a nice time to live.  I feel as if Cat Winters has her own strong feeling written in this book as well as her fictional story...

In it she writes as the German young man:

Since my immigration, I have learned that Americans have belittled, beaten and killed their black and native citizens for centuries.  The recent number of abused and murdered Germans and other foreign-born residents seems relatively small in comparison to the crimes against the nonwhites of this country.  Yet this added surge of hatred only proves that America has no right sailing to foreign lands in the name of protecting freedom-not when we're  steeped in the mire of violent inequality here at home.

I will leave it at that... and, just ask:  do you believe in ghosts?

Monday, October 31, 2016

The Hidden Child

The Hidden Child by Camilla Lackberg.

Hardcover: 526 pages
Publisher: Pegasus (May 15, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1605985538


    



 

Amazon Review:

The brilliant new psychological thriller from worldwide bestseller Camilla Läckberg―the chilling struggle of a young woman facing the darkest chapter of Europe’s past.

Crime writer Erica Falck is shocked to discover a Nazi medal among her late mother’s possessions. Haunted by a childhood of neglect, she resolves to dig deep into her family’s past and finally uncover the reasons why. Her enquiries lead her to the home of a retired history teacher. He was among her mother’s circle of friends during the Second World War but her questions are met with bizarre and evasive answers. Two days later he meets a violent death. Detective patrik Hedström, Erica’s husband, is on paternity leave but soon becomes embroiled in the murder investigation. Who would kill so ruthlessly to bury secrets so old? Reluctantly Erica must read her mother’s wartime diaries. But within the pages is a painful revelation about Erica’s past. Could what little knowledge she has be enough to endanger her husband and newborn baby? The dark past is coming to light, and no one will escape the truth of how they came to be .

I wasn't real sure about this book but it turned out to be very enjoyable!  If there was one drawback it was trying to figure out how to say Sweden and German names!  Other than that.. I really liked it.

The background is the time and place in which it took place. The time was 1943-1945 during the ending of WWII.

There was everything you would want in this book.  Many "secrets" to be figured out.  A few murders to figure out.  And how the combination of everything comes together!

I surprised myself at reading a book over 500 pages before October ended.  But I did!  Finished the book yesterday and trying to post it here on Halloween!

This was  an interesting book that was also filled with a historical time and how people managed in such a horrid time.  I will admit that the time period and it being "historical fiction" it helped a lot.  If you are in to figuring out mysteries and "family secrets" this well might be a book for you!

Friday, October 21, 2016

Abomination

Abomination by Colleen Coble.

Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Thomas Nelson (May 11, 2008)
ISBN-10: 159554478X

 



 

A beautiful woman stands by the side of the road, barefoot and bleeding, a child in her arms. Someone just tried to kill her, but she wouldn't recognize him if she saw his face. She doesn't even remember her own name.
A suburban cop surveys a kitchen in disarray--a woman and child missing, a chilling note. This crime scene is unlike any he has ever seen.
The man who calls himself Gideon waits and plans. He sees himself as a destroyer of evil, one who rids the world of abominations. He has already killed five. He will kill again.
And somewhere in the wilderness, in a secret geocache near where the wild swans gather, lies the unspeakable clue that links them all together.
Michigan's rugged and beautiful Upper Peninsula is the setting for this absorbing tale of love and loss, beauty and terror, grievous sins and second chances. A deftly woven thriller from the popular author of the Rock Harbor novels.


I enjoyed this book.  There were a few back stories along with the search for the serial killer. 

The writing was quite good and easily followed.  With the woman having amnesia it gave me a feeling that any moment she would remember...   I can't even imagine not remembering your whole life!  There is the back story of her X-husband and why they divorced.  And surprises along the way. 

She hid the killer really well.  I had no idea until it was obvious.

Like I said, it was a good read. I had never heard of this author before (and found out she has LOTS of books out and many happen in the same place that this one occurs, so if you like the book.. there are many more!

Onward to my next read!.................

Friday, October 14, 2016

The Thirteenth Tale






Book 7 (and the last) book for RIP..........

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield.

Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: Washington Square Press (October 9, 2007)
ISBN-10: 0743298039






Amazon.com Review
Settle down to enjoy a rousing good ghost story with Diane Setterfield's debut novel, The Thirteenth Tale. Setterfield has rejuvenated the genre with this closely plotted, clever foray into a world of secrets, confused identities, lies, and half-truths. She never cheats by pulling a rabbit out of a hat; this atmospheric story hangs together perfectly.


There are two heroines here: Vida Winter, a famous author, whose life story is coming to an end, and Margaret Lea, a young, unworldly, bookish girl who is a bookseller in her father's shop. Vida has been confounding her biographers and fans for years by giving everybody a different version of her life, each time swearing it's the truth. Because of a biography that Margaret has written about brothers, Vida chooses Margaret to tell her story, all of it, for the first time. At their initial meeting, the conversation begins:

"You have given nineteen different versions of your life story to journalists in the last two years alone."

She [Vida] shrugged. "It's my profession. I'm a storyteller."

"I am a biographer, I work with facts."

The game is afoot and Margaret must spend some time sorting out whether or not Vida is actually ready to tell the whole truth. There is more here of Margaret discovering than of Vida cooperating wholeheartedly, but that is part of Vida's plan. The transformative power of truth informs the lives of both women by story's end, and The Thirteenth Tale is finally and convincingly told.

This is the fourth time that I have read The Thirteenth Tale for the RIP challenge.  And since I do not write reviews well anymore.... this is what I wrote about it the last time I read it in 2008...............

Although this is a mystery.. and I do know the outcome, I still enjoyed reading this book.  Maybe it's because I am older and forget more, and forget it more quickly, I'm not sure.  But I do know that as I began the book, it did not take long to grab hold of me to begin me on the journey that Margaret was about to begin when she decided to write Vida Winter's biography.

For anyone who loves books this is a good book to read.  In the beginning of the book, when Margaret was not sure she wanted to do the biography, while in her apartment  I came across this passage of Margarets behavior:

It was nearly time.  I moved swiftly.  In the bathroom I soaped my face and brushed my teeth.  By three minutes  to eight I was in my nightdress and slippers, waiting for the kettle to boil. Quickly, quickly.  A minute to eight my hot water bottle was ready, and I filled a glass with water from the tap.  Time was of the essence.  For at eight o'clock the world came to an end.  It was reading time.

I can't tell you how many times I have come close to this exact statement! At about seven each night I shut down my computer, turn off the living room television and fan and get ready to pile up my pillows on my bed to lean against and to grab my current read and "hit the bed to read"! Nearly ALL the time.. same routine!

This book, as it has done three other times, just takes a hold of me and I read way more hours than I normally do. I don't seem to get as tired as quickly and one chapter leads to another and another as that's how this story goes..I just could not put it down.

You find yourself wondering if you missed a clue to anything. (and more than likely you have, but that's ok you will remember them when the time is right.) And other times you find yourself trying to figure out a piece of the story before it is revealed by Vida Winter. 

This is such a fantastic book.  The writing just refuses to let you go and do anything but continue reading, and once you are sucked into the mystery (which doesn't take long!) you just have to know those untold secrets !

It's so much fun when the secrets begin to emerge and you find yourself asking why you missed the clues!  So subtle.  But they are all there!

I finally let it go knowing I would come back to it some day.... I am shocked that I let it go this long, but I did enjoy it as much as the first time I read it..........Yeah.. in my opinion.. The Thirteenth Tale is that good!

 

Sunday, October 09, 2016

Who Buries the Dead

Book 6 for RIP...





Who Buries the Dead by C.S. Harris.

Hardcover: 352 pages
Publisher: NAL; First Edition(March 3, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0451417569






London, 1813. The vicious decapitation of Stanley Preston, a wealthy, socially ambitious plantation owner, at Bloody Bridge draws Sebastian St. Cyr, Viscount Devlin, into a macabre and increasingly perilous investigation. The discovery near the body of an aged lead coffin strap bearing the inscription King Charles, 1648 suggests a link between this killing and the beheading of the deposed seventeenth-century Stuart monarch. Equally troubling, the victim’s kinship to the current Home Secretary draws the notice of Sebastian’s powerful father-in-law, Lord Jarvis, who will exploit any means to pursue his own clandestine ends.
Working in concert with his fiercely independent wife, Hero, Sebastian finds his inquiries taking him from the wretched back alleys of Fish Street Hill to the glittering ballrooms of Mayfair as he amasses a list of suspects who range from an eccentric Chelsea curiosity collector to the brother of an unassuming but brilliantly observant spinster named Jane Austen.
But as one brutal murder follows another, it is the connection between the victims and ruthless former army officer Sinclair, Lord Oliphant, that dramatically raises the stakes. Once, Oliphant nearly destroyed Sebastian in a horrific wartime act of carnage and betrayal. Now the vindictive former colonel might well pose a threat not only to Sebastian but to everything—and everyone—Sebastian holds most dear.


This is the 4th book I have read by C.S. Harris in the Sebastian St. Cyr series.

I liked this book very much.  Sebastian St. Cyr is a good character. He's not a police officer nor a detective so he reports to no one but his wife and father-in-law.

Harris is very descriptive of many scenes and you can feel the atmosphere in which the story takes place.

Through this series the secondary story is of  Sebastian who went from  being single to falling in love and marrying his wife Hero and having a son.  Other than the back story the St Cyr  stories are based on the History of the time in England.

Very good read but I might want to read a few of the older books first. The other 3 I've read are: Where Serpents Sleep, When Maidens Mourn and What  Angels Fear.  All enjoyable books.

Monday, October 03, 2016

Carved In Bone

BOOK 5 FOR RIP....

Carved in Bone by Jefferson Bass.

Hardcover: 352 pages
Publisher: William Morrow(January 24, 2006)
ISBN-10: 006075981X




 

Amazon Review:

On the campus of the University of Tennessee lies a patch of ground unlike any in the world. The "Body Farm" is a place where human corpses are left to the elements, and every manner of decay is fully explored -- for the sake of science and the cause of justice. The scientist who created the Body Farm has broken cold cases and revolutionized forensics, and now, in this heart-stopping novel, he spins an astonishing tale inspired by his own experiences.

A woman's corpse lies hidden in a cave in the mountains of East Tennessee. Undiscovered for thirty years, her body has been transformed by the cave's chemistry into a near-perfect mummy -- one that discloses an explosive secret to renowned anthropologist Bill Brockton. Dr. Brockton has spent his career surrounded by death and decay at the Body Farm, but even he is baffled by this case unfolding in a unique environment where nothing is quite what it seems.

The surreal setting is Cooke County, a remote mountain community that's clannish, insular, and distrustful of outsiders. The heartbreaking discovery of the young woman's corpse reopens old wounds and rekindles feuds dating back decades. The county's powerful and uncooperative sheriff and his inept deputy threaten to derail Brockton's investigation altogether. So do Brockton's other nemeses: his lingering guilt over the death of his wife, and the fury of a medical examiner whom Brockton dares to oppose in court.

Carved in Bone is a richly atmospheric, superbly suspenseful, and magnificently rendered trip into the world of forensic science, the heart of the Appalachian Mountains, and the dark passageways of the human psyche. Full of vivid characters and startling twists and turns, this thrilling novel heralds the debut of a major new voice in crime fiction -- and an unforgettable work from the hand of a scientific legend.

This is the second most favorite book I've read for RIP.  (the winner still being The Life we Bury)  Loved the writing and short chapters!  I love when an author includes some reality, such as "the body farm".  Also love short chapters .. it makes me read more at a time.  

It's amazing when one realizes how much can be learned about bones and what happens to a body after death .  It's nothing I could do, but it's a bit fascinating.  I will most likely read at least one or two other books by this author as he has quite a series labeled, "A body farm novel". 

I guess it helped my enjoyment that it takes place in the Smoky Mts. , a place where I was just 2 yrs ago. (happily I did not see the body farm!) and love the area and mts and trees so much that it made me feel like I was back there.

I would definitely recommend this book!

 

 

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Every Dead Thing

Book 4 for RIP....

Every Dead Thing by John Connelly.

Paperback: 512 pages
Publisher: Atria/Emily Bestler Books(June 16, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1501122622


 

Amazon Review.

Former NYPD detective Charlie "Bird" Parker is on the verge of madness. Tortured by the unsolved slayings of his wife and young daughter, he is a man consumed by guilt, regret, and the desire for revenge. When his former partner asks him to track down a missing girl, Parker finds himself drawn into a world beyond his imagining: a world where thirty-year-old killings remain shrouded in fear and lies, a world where the ghosts of the dead torment the living, a world haunted by the murderer responsible for the deaths in his family—a serial killer who uses the human body to create works of art and takes faces as his prize. But the search awakens buried instincts in Parker: instincts for survival, for compassion, for love, and, ultimately, for killing.
Aided by a beautiful young psychologist and a pair of bickering career criminals, Parker becomes the bait in a trap set in the humid bayous of Louisiana, a trap that threatens the lives of everyone in its reach. Driven by visions of the dead and the voice of an old black psychic who met a terrible end, Parker must seek a final, brutal confrontation with a murderer who has moved beyond all notions of humanity, who has set out to create a hell on earth: the serial killer known only as the Traveling Man.
In the tradition of classic American detective fiction, Every Dead Thing is a tense, richly plotted thriller, filled with memorable characters and gripping action. It is also a profoundly moving novel, concerned with the nature of loyalty, love, and forgiveness. Lyrical and terrifying, it is an ambitious debut, triumphantly realized.




I have read 2 other books by John Connolly and liked them both.  This one was another good book.  "Bird" was on the search for the cold case in which his wife and child were killed.... but not "just" killed.

At times he almost lost me by having so many people involved that I'd start wondering what the heck was going on.  But eventually it cleared up and I once again knew what it was all about.   I am a bit brain dead when I get too many characters to keep track of lol.

I enjoyed this book enough to order yet another book by the same author.  Which surprises me since  "detectives" are getting to be the "norm" when in truth my favorite books are still more to the "family secrets" when solving a crime.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The Life We Bury

Book 3 for RIP...



 

The Life We Bury by Allen Eskens.

Paperback: 303 pages
Publisher: Seventh Street Books(October 14, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1616149981


 



 

College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same.
Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran--and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.
As Joe writes about Carl's life, especially Carl's valor in Vietnam, he cannot reconcile the heroism of the soldier with the despicable acts of the convict. Joe, along with his skeptical female neighbor, throws himself into uncovering the truth, but he is hamstrung in his efforts by having to deal with his dangerously dysfunctional mother, the guilt of leaving his autistic brother vulnerable, and a haunting childhood memory. 
Thread by thread, Joe unravels the tapestry of Carl’s conviction. But as he and Lila dig deeper into the circumstances of the crime, the stakes grow higher. Will Joe discover the truth before it’s too late to escape the fallout?


Ok... best book I've read in a long time!! I hated this book to end!  Loved the characters, loved the story (stories)..nothing I didn't like about this book!.. well, except that I didn't want it to end but couldn't stop reading it!

Excellent mystery of a "cold case" pulled up due to and English project for Joe.  Toss in Joe's background and a small love story and you have it all in a very good, too short, book.  I had this book on my wish list for some time and sorry now that I waited so long to send for the used copy!!

It's a keeper!  Ya'll  might want to read this one!

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

The Woman Who Walked Into the Sea

Book 2 for RIP...



 

The Woman who Walked into the Sea by Mark Douglas-Home.

Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: Sandstone Press (November 12, 2013)
ISBN-10: 1908737328




Amazon Review:

Cal McGill watches the young woman through the dirty windshield of his Toyota. There's something compelling about her stillness, about the length of time she has been standing, staring out to sea. What has brought her to this remote beach, he asks himself. Is she a kindred spirit who finds refuge by the shore? Idle curiosity soon turns into another investigation for oceanographer and loner McGill as he embarks on a quest to discover why, 26 years earlier, another young woman walked into these same waves. According to the police, she killed herself and her unborn baby. McGill, the Sea Detective, questions this version of events and confronts the jealousies, tensions, and threats of a coastal community determined to hold on to its secrets.

Hooray! A real mystery!!  Of course it includes a dead body or two..  but the mystery is finding out ones past.  I liked the writing style in this book and found I looked forward to picking it up each time.

The only strange thing about the book is that Cal McGill did not really seem like a "detective" but more of a person wanting to help in the situation.  However I did like that it wasn't a detective constantly going to his office and reporting to others.   I enjoyed the book and all the mysteries surrounding the story! 

 

Friday, September 09, 2016

The Silent Girls



First book for RIP!

The Silent Girls by Eric Rickstad.

Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Witness Impulse (January 27, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0062351540




Amazon Review:

With the dead of a bitter Vermont winter closing in, evil is alive and well . . .

Frank Rath thought he was done with murder when he turned in his detective's badge to become a private investigator and raise a daughter alone. Then the police in his remote rural community of Canaan find an '89 Monte Carlo abandoned by the side of the road, and the beautiful teenage girl who owned the car seems to have disappeared without a trace.

Soon Rath's investigation brings him face-to-face with the darkest abominations of the human soul.

With the consequences of his violent and painful past plaguing him, and young women with secrets vanishing one by one, he discovers once again that even in the smallest towns on the map, evil lurks everywhere—and no one is safe.

Morally complex, seething with wickedness and mystery, and rich in gritty atmosphere and electrifying plot turns, The Silent Girls marks the return of critically acclaimed author Eric Rickstad. Readers of Ian Rankin, Jo Nesbø, and Greg Iles will love this book and find themselves breathless at the incendiary, ambitious, and unforgettable story.

A good mystery right up to the end!  A new missing person case connects to some old cold cases, and if that's not bed enough Rath's daughter turns up missing!  It began like most detective stories but it got better and better as it went along. 

I still prefer mysteries with lots of family secrets in them but it seems more and more books are detective books.  If you get a really good and interesting main character then it's good when more books come out using the protagonist that you have come to find so interesting.

This is my first book by Eric Rickstad  so I don't know if he uses Frank Rath in other books yet.